Fuck It

Obamacare is forcing me to chose between eating and paying for insurance I can’t afford anymore. It’s forcing me to choose between living and taking the easy way out. Obamacare has fucked me over good! For those of you that suppose this shit, why don’t you take a good look at the people it’s really hurting! I’m so pissed right now I can’t event share every thing. But soon. Very soon.

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Amazing!

This is a story you MUST read! Please, read this! I don’t care your takes on guns or our president, I don’t want to hear it! Read the story!

The Cops Amaze Me

The cops amaze me.

Some days I honestly don’t know how they do it.

Like yesterday, at the Navy Yard.

We know about the bad guy, we know about his military record and his criminal record. And we know what he did.

But we don’t know much about how he came to stop doing what he was doing.

We don’t know much about how they took him down.

But what we do know is impressive.

Which gets back to the cops.

Yesterday morning about 8:20, the first 9-1-1 call came in of trouble in Building 197. Moments later, an alert was broadcast and officers began speeding toward the Navy Yard from across the District of Columbia.

Regular patrol officers.

Some from schools, some from speed-enforcement details, all from the first hour a new shift and a new week. Old, young, male, female, black, white. They just came. Primarily from the Metropolitan Police Department and the Federal Park Police.

Officers whose lives were going from zero to 60 in the blink of an eye. Officers who went from the sleepy good morning of a Monday dawn to the real-world battlefield of an active shooter.

They began to arrive almost immediately.

And quickly formed up into an assault team.

They didn’t wait for the SWAT team. They didn’t stand back and wait for the armored personnel carrier. They formed up and went in.

Specifically, seven minutes after the first call, an ad hoc team of park police and district police with AR-15s ran into the building in their patrol uniforms.

They ran to the sound of the gunfire.

They closed with the enemy, and engaged him, and killed him.

And by every account some 10 minutes after the first word of trouble had breathed across the police radio, regular patrol officers had killed the gunman and ended his assault.

He fought the law, and the law won.

It’s impossible to calculate how many lives that saved. It’s impossible to calculate how much expertise that took.

It’s impossible to grasp the mindset of readiness that must permeate the men and women of law enforcement. Without notice, the police can be thrown into life-and-death situations where every second and every decision counts.

And sometimes, like yesterday, they must operate in an environment that is heartbreaking and troubling. The responding officers at the Navy Yard ran past the dead and dying, their blood pooling where they lay, in order to press their attack against a monster.

And that was just yesterday.

Every day it is different, every call it is different. Sometimes they are comforting heartbroken children, other times they are knocking on the door to inform someone of the death of a relative. Sometimes they are spat upon, other times they are vomited upon. They are hated and loved, cursed and praised, sometimes on the same call.

They see the carnage of the highways, the sorrow of abused and neglected children, the collapse of a battered wife. They talk the despondent off bridges, they catch the drunk drivers, they try to mediate family and neighbor disputes.

And half the time they do it while being cussed by one group or another. Maybe it’s the neighborhood people. Maybe it’s the pastors. Maybe it’s an activist with a cell-phone video.

The politicians trash them, the residents trash them, the police brass trashes them. They’re ready to lay down their lives for strangers, but heaven help them if anybody thinks they were impolite to a citizen. Heaven help them if they disrespected somebody’s culture.

They fight crime all day, every day, and usually it is a pretty low-key affair. Until there’s a glint of sunlight or a stumbling drunk or a dispatch on the radio.

That’s when it’s Superman time.

That’s when the next 10 minutes of your life are going to be some of the most important in your life.

Like yesterday at the Navy Yard.

Across a big city, the routine of the morning worked its way out. Until there was a cry for help, and the sirens began to roar, and a crew of men and women from at least a couple of departments ran toward the danger.

And killed it.

Before he could kill anybody else.

The cops amaze me.

Petition?

As you know, if you’ve read my past blogs, I pretty much hate our worthless, over spending, I’m too good to work a day in my life government. They are wasting money on lazy ass people while the military fighting for us are getting cuts. People in prison get better amenities than our military and old folks in nursing homes. Did you know it’s a federal law that TV’s have to be available to prisoners…??? Are you kidding me??? I say we do it like other countries, no food unless someone gives you money. No TV, no sun…or just take you out of town and drop you for dead and see if you can make it back.

Anyway, I came across this petition today and had to share. People have created a petition to try to get Obama to resign. I’d love to see himself and our entire government resign and start over! They have ruined what this country was created on! Anyway, I’m too busy to keep ranting about this right now but the link is below if you want to check it out. Work has been keeping me too busy to blog but I will be back soon…I hope! Take care all!

https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/we-demand-president-obama-resign/sTtJndXm

Dyslexia, Yes I Have It

People look at me like I’m crazy when I tell them I can’t read. When I say I can’t read, I’m being completely honest there. I truly cannot read. Then how did I make it this far in life? Why did I pass school? Did I cheat? Well…no, but I sure did struggle. Let me explain on my inability to read. If you give me a word I have never seen before, I can’t read it, I can’t pronounce it, I just sit there staring at it. When it comes to other words, like the ones I type in my blog here, the are words I have seen before and had to have people tell me. I memorize, I see the word and make someone say the word and that’s how I “read”. That’s the best way I can describe it to someone that doesn’t understand and have the disorder.

So how did I get though school? Well I’m not a complete idiot. I have this ability to remember the things said to me, it’s part of my memorizing. If the teacher actually “teaches” instead of saying “go home and read this” then I will learn it and probably won’t forget it, ever. Not many teachers did that and the further in school I got, the less they did it. Spelling tests…those were a damn nightmare! And just anything that required reading…it was horrible! School was the toughest thing I have ever done!

All this came about when I came across the following article. You can read it at this link or read below.

Dyslexia Workarounds: Creativity Without a Lot of Reading

Actor Henry Winkler was told he was stupid. A teacher labeled Dan Malloy, the future governor of Connecticut, “mentally retarded.” Delos Cosgrove recalls “hanging on by my fingernails” in high school and college before becoming a thoracic surgeon and the Cleveland Clinic’s chief executive officer.

Each has dyslexia, a condition that makes reading difficult but has little to do with intelligence. Mounting evidence shows that many people with dyslexia are highly creative, out-of-the-box thinkers, and neuroimaging studies demonstrate that their brains really do think differently.

That helps explain the long list of entrepreneurs, inventors, scientists, actors and other professionals, doctors and lawyers who have excelled despite, or perhaps because of, their affliction, experts say.

“There are people who are dyslexic that you could never imagine,” says Sally Shaywitz, co-director, with her husband Bennett, of the Yale Center for Dyslexia and Creativity. When they give talks on dyslexia at high-powered gatherings such as the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, she says, “We can’t walk down the hall without people pulling us aside and saying they think they have it, too.”

Celebrities who have spoken out about having dyslexia:

  • Actors: Orlando Bloom, Whoopi Goldberg, Anthony Hopkins, Keira Knightley, Henry Winkler
  • Director: Steven Spielberg
  • Lawyer: David Boies
  • Writers: John Irving, Wendy Wasserstein, Philip Schultz
  • Politicians: California Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, Connecticut Gov. Dan Malloy
  • Scientists: Nobel Laureate Carol Greider, Paleontologist Jack Horner
  • Historical figures believed to have had dyslexia: Leonardo da Vinci, Alexander Graham Bell, Albert Einstein, Ben Franklin

Source: WSJ reporting

The Cleveland Clinic’s Dr. Cosgrove says he relied on memorizing texts in medical school, and reading hasn’t gotten easier for him. He says he has never read a novel and told his staff he’d rather hear about any problems in person than read a report.

But, he says, “I frankly think dyslexia is a gift. If you are supported in school and your ego remains intact, then you emerge with a strong work ethic and a different view of the world.”

As many as one in five Americans has some degree of dyslexia, according to Yale research, although only about 5% of children have been formally diagnosed. And it clearly runs in families; six gene variations have been linked to the condition to date. Dyslexia was long thought to be a vision-related problem, but there’s a growing consensus that dyslexics instead have difficulty associating letters with spoken sounds and blending them together fluidly to make words. Neuroimaging studies can even pinpoint what goes awry.

Reading typically involves three distinct areas of the brain, all on the left side. The parieto-temporal region, just behind the ear, and the inferior frontal gyrus, at the front, slowly analyze words. The occipital-temporal area farther back recognizes the whole word instantly. Scientists think a word’s meaning, pronunciation and spelling are stored there too.

Imaging studies show that the best readers have the most brain activity in the rear, instant-word-forming area when they read. Dyslexics have much less activity there and more in the two slower areas.

“Think of the word ‘bat,’ ” says Dr. Shaywitz. “If you are dyslexic, you have to retrieve the B and the A and the T separately each time. It’s exhausting.”

Dyslexia can’t be cured, but imaging studies show that some remedial programs that help children learn sequential sound-letter relationships can rewire those circuits. Without such help, dyslexics may become accurate readers, but they never read fluidly. They often have problems spelling, writing, reading aloud and pronouncing words.

That’s why experts urge schools to give students with dyslexia extra time on tests, waive foreign language requirements and grade separately for creativity and spelling. But many schools don’t, according to a federal report commissioned last year by the Congressional Dyslexia Caucus.

 Among dyslexics who succeed, Dr. Shaywitz says many “give up their social lives and everything else to spend more hours studying. They are very bright, but they are terribly anxious and think, ‘I’ve just been fooling everybody.’ “

Other children with dyslexia become discouraged early on and continue to fall further behind their peers, even if their IQs are high.

Helping them access information in ways other than reading can be critical, experts say. Audio books and computer programs that can turn written text into spoken words and vice versa can keep their minds stimulated and vocabulary growing.

Gov. Malloy credits his mother for believing in his potential and giving him a radio to listen to at night. Having to read slowly helped him master complicated issues as he went from a New York City prosecutor to mayor of Stamford, Conn. He was elected governor in 2010. But even now, he says, “I have to stop and call each word up and do the best I can.”

At auditions, Henry Winkler memorized scripts in advance or ad-libbed if he forgot. “Some people got upset that I wasn’t reading the words, but I told them I was giving them the essence of it,” says Mr. Winkler, who played Fonzie on TV’s long-running “Happy Days” and many other roles. He is the co-author of 23 books for children in the series “Hank Zipzer, The World’s Greatest Underachiever,” about a resourceful fourth-grader with dyslexia.

Jack Horner’s reading ability is so poor that he says he bought shampoo for dogs instead of people recently. He left high school in the 1960s with all Ds and flunked out of college.

Mr. Horner also made some of the most spectacular dinosaur finds in the Western hemisphere. He won a MacArthur Foundation “genius” grant, has two honorary degrees, inspired a character in “Jurassic Park” and is curator of paleontology for the largest Tyrannosaurus rex collection in the world.

How did he do it? He took a low-level museum job and worked his way up. And as he tells his students at Montana State University: “If you’re the first to do something, you don’t have to read about it.”

Other people with dyslexia find that they thrive only outside the world of reading and writing. “Find what you love and enjoy it,” says Piper Otterbein, a high school senior from Cape Elizabeth, Maine, whose talk at a TEDYouth conference has become a YouTube sensation. After years of tutoring and remedial classes, she dropped English, math and French and has found her passion, and self-esteem, in art and design. “I decided my creative brain is the one that suits me best,” she says.

Many adults with dyslexia say life does get easier, even if their reading skills don’t. Secretaries, co-authors, book editors and spouses can take dictation, spell and proofread. “There are very few times when adults are judged on being timed in reading,” unlike the standardized tests kids take in school, says Tyler Lucas, a New York-based orthopedic surgeon who realized he was dyslexic after his daughter was diagnosed with it.

The proliferation of smartphones, video chats and other technologies may also make the future easier for people with dyslexia, he adds. “Reading is just one way of communicating—and in the future, I think it won’t be as important as in the past.”

Expectations

Expectations. Everyone has them, some expect more than others. Right now I expect the weather people to get it right, just once, and yet again they failed.

I was stuck in hell job today, oh goodie. I am losing a huge battle, the battle if lazy. And I’m talking the “beyond fucking lazy fuckers”! You know what I’m talking about, the recliner, get me this, lazy. I’ve been of for a while, came in to find a fucking mess! The trucks are dirty and falling apart! Dried blood all over, scratches all over the pain, floors are a mess, looks like it hasn’t been washed in a fucking month! I was pissed. I spent 4 hours cleaning it all!! Inside and out! On just ONE truck!

I fight this battle all the time. An ambulance is a business. In order for businesses to make money you must have good customer service, right? Does grandma care that you got an 16G IV in her tiny arm? Or does she care that your truck was clean and you were nice? The patient AND the ambulance pay your salary…take care of both!

My medic today expects a LOT more than I do! He expects you to know exactly where you are going, what to do, how to park, how to freaking breath!! He expects you to be perfect. I’m the furthest thing from perfect there is! But I will continue to try to be better like he wants. But for now…some sleep…