2013

I pray I never have to see it. I was doing so good you fucking assholes! Even the snow can’t cheer me up. Fuck you you ignorant fucking fucks! I hope you get run over by a semi!

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Caching in the SNOW!!

Yesterday I went to work, never bothered to check the weather. It was just suppose to be cold. Watched the news, they said cold, nothing else. At 1pm it started SNOWING!! I mean HUGE FLAKES!! I was SO excited! Damn weather people, can never get it right. It snowed until well after I got up this morning. We only have about 2 inches but it was snowing it’s ass off for quit some time! Just too warm of ground for it to stick until after.

I worked in the snow, at hell. Hell froze over! lol It wasn’t too bad because the bitch didn’t show up! Sure made my day! The assholes there are bitching that bringing this union in means they are going to lose their hours. I went off on one of them and said, “you signed the card, YOU have NO right to complain! I on the other hand do because I knew this would happen but no one listened.” Apparently they want to start negations soon…you can’t negate more money out of a city that has none…fucking idiots! So now that they got this damn union they wanted it means we are cut off at 32 hours a week, where I normally had 80 or so but we never got over time pay because we weren’t classified as part time. That didn’t bother me because I could get all my hours at one job, saving me money and hassle of driving to many locations. We weren’t required to do chores or even stay at the station, now we can’t leave and have to work from 8-4 every day doing chores and whatever else they give us. We can’t ask for a raise because the city is broke, but now we are paying union dues…in the end it means less money, WAY less money but no one listened to me!! That’s why the past Chief quit, because of this union and they shit everyone is pulling. Now they fucked us! And I refuse to listen to any of them bitch! And they will know it!

If we get enough snow there I have plans to build a snowmen, one I found online that is freaking sweet!! : )

IMG_3052We didn’t have enough snow for that yet! However, we did get quit a bit…enough to making caching a little more difficult! Here’s a few pictures of our adventure in the woods.

It was beautiful but man was it cold! I did get to try out my new GPS my man got me! It worked GREAT! Though he is stuck at work for today and tomorrow so he didn’t get to join. But he made sure I bundled up and told me to have fun, which I sure did! I can’t wait to go again! And since I have a LOT of time off in January…I guess I’ll spend it caching as much as possible.

Firefighting the Second-Most Stressful Job in the Nation, White Paper Reports

One more for your reading…maybe this one will help you think twice when voting on fire department taxes.

A new job-stress report by CareerCast.com found that firefighters have the second most-stressful job in the country, exceeded only by those enrolled in the military.

The job-stress white paper states that 36% of all workers admit they feel tense or stressed out during their workdays, with 20% reporting that their average daily level of stress is an 8, 9 or 10 on a 10-point scale. Tony Lee, publisher of CareerCast.com — a free job website — said researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison regularly research and update statistics for the report. Researchers use 11 different stress factors to compile data, which includes whether the job has high physical demands, what environmental issues are present, the amount of hazards, risk to life, hiring outlook and more.

Lee said firefighters ranked second on the job stress scale because they take on dangerous and complex fires, often coming in contact with poisonous gases or other hazardous materials for a relatively low salary, at about $45,250 annually. Whether it’s running into burning buildings to save lives, putting out raging fires or responding to a serious accident, firefighters are under pressure to put their lives on the line to save others, he said.

What helped move firefighters up to the second spot was their level of stress coupled with the threat of job loss. Lee said while it is an incredibly “tough job,” many firefighters “may not be able to keep it because of budget cutbacks and municipalities’ and counties’ inability to keep all their firefighters,” he said. “So that adds to the stress level even more.”

CareerCast ranked firefighting as the most-stressful occupation in 2010.

What Does Your Bumper Say about Your Rig?

I read this story in JEMS magazine a while back and thought I would share it with my fellow fire/EMS workers that read my blog. I work my ass off to clean, scrub, and polish our trucks at hell job. I clean them every day I’m on duty, usually by myself, and make sure all of it’s clean. I fix things that are broken. I pick up after people. I do my best to make sure the trucks are as clean as possible and besides me, only one other person does that. Him and I see to be the only ones that care…

Here’s the story for your reading if you don’t want to click and go to the link.

Life ain’t easy for a trained observer.

Ever noticed how that works, Life-Saver? You can’t help wondering about stuff the average person would likely never even notice. Like the guy sitting in your favorite coffee shop an hour before dawn with a pair of sunglasses on his head. Or a lady in a late-model pick up, who’s about to make a right turn onto a high-speed country roadway from a side street while chatting at a stop sign with a neighbor in another vehicle. Normally, she wouldn’t have caught your attention, but the lady in the truck has her arm around a smiling, shirtless 2-year-old, who looks like he’s standing on her lap. The child is waving its arms through the driver’s open window.

Now, coming into your little town, you’re stopped at an intersection behind a local, big-city medic unit. It occupies most of your forward field of vision, so you can’t help but notice its rear-facing features: dark, dusty glass; water streaks traversing the signage; scratches on the top corners of the box, and a broken lens on an amber flasher. Its three-roof antennas are all pointing in different directions, and its ragged-looking dock bumper is surrounded by leaden-looking diamond plate that hasn’t had any lovin’ in years. Even the edges of the agency’s logo are beginning to curl away from the dull white finish on the box.

The whole ambulance appears whipped. But the bumper in particular looks like it’s been through a war. There’s one dent that could’ve been inflicted by one of those jumping power poles. Another one might have stopped a Buick at a slow early Alzheimer’s ramming speed. And at least half a dozen smaller ones are more likely reminders of backing incidents. Steel pipe parking barriers, maybe, with missing paint flecks. Or twisted shopping carts with misaligned wheels. This agency clearly doesn’t use backers, and they don’t seem too concerned about the consequences of that omission.

Tell you what: I think when an ambulance goes in to be serviced, its mechanics and cosmetics need to be equally addressed. Chances are the public doesn’t know diddly about physiology or pharmacology. But they base important inferences on what they see. And what do they see?

Imagine you know nothing at all about EMS. You wouldn’t know the difference between an inotrope and a heliotrope. But you’re sitting in your Corolla at an intersection next to a medic unit, waiting for a signal. That would put you at eye level with everything below the vehicle’s beltline, at a distance of just a few feet. So you have nothing better to do than inspect the thing.

What do you see? You see the overall mass of the ambulance, certainly. More particularly, you see fender skirts, rub rails, the edges of the exterior compartment doors, the signage, the wheel covers, the lighting and the bumpers. If you happen to be following the vehicle instead of riding alongside it, that rear bumper’s right there in front of you. You can’t miss it.

What do you think? If what you can see is immaculate, then it pretty much invites your attention. It’ll be a small leap to surmise the crew is composed of professionals who know and care about what they’re doing. (Same goes for their leaders, actually.) These are people who pay attention to details, starting with the features of their own equipment. On the other hand, if the whole ambulance looks dirty, thrashed and neglected, that would also command your attention. You might assess its occupants and their bosses as, well … not so professional. They obviously don’t respect their logo or their equipment. Their scratched, bent, scummy wheel covers, their misaligned, dingy trim, and their tortured old bumper are testimonials to their lack of concern about all kinds of other stuff. Like dosages, maybe, or the control of icky substances.

I know that many of us serve people willingly—even joyfully, without conditions or expectations. But as long as EMS has been a dream, we’ve lamented their lack of respect or appreciation for what we do every day. I think we can do something about that. I think we can make it impossible for them, whenever they encounter us, to see us as anything but professionals.

Maybe the cosmetics and cleanliness of our vehicles are way more important than we think they are. And maybe that begins and ends with our rear bumpers. JEMS

So when you’re working, maybe you should consider what your bumper says about your company, don’t be lazy. It doesn’t take long if everyone gets involved. Hell, I spend every shift cleaning 3 trucks, BY MYSELF, and it only takes me roughly 3-4 hours depending on the level of dirtiness. The more people involved, the faster.

Giving Up

I can’t do this anymore!

I can’t take it anymore!

I have tried and tried to change shit, it never works!

I have begged, pleaded, prayed, reasoned and it NEVER works!

Nothing ever changes!

Nothing is ever easy!

Why can’t people just leave me the fuck alone?

I can’t do this shit anymore!

I don’t want to be here!

I don’t want this life, I don’t want to take another breath!

I’m tired of the tears, I’m tired of crying, and I’m just tired.

No one can ever fix this.

No one cares to try.

I made a promise I don’t want to keep.

This is my giving up…again.

mrbailey

Christmas Murder

Did everyone out there have a good Christmas? I sure hope so! I hope you got to spend time with you family and friends, got everything you wanted on your Christmas list, and I hope Santa was extra good to you! While you were celebrating, don’t forget to say a little prayer for those protecting your celebration and ready to respond if something happened.

Don’t forget about the Soldier fighting for your safety and freedom, especially those that don’t get to spend these holiday’s with their family. Don’t forget the Police Officers who are trying to keep the roads safe. Don’t forget the Firefighter who are always ready for your emergency. Don’t forget the EMT/Paramedics who are waiting and ready in the event a loved one has trouble. Don’t forget the Dispatchers who make this all possible. Don’t forget the Nurses and Doctors who are standing by, in case they are needed. Don’t forget the people that don’t get to spend their holidays with their families, but are more than willing to help you if something happened. But most of all, don’t forget those Soldiers, Police Officers, Firefighters, and EMT/Paramedics who never return home to their families, don’t forget our fallen brothers and sisters.

If you haven’t been watching the news or you don’t follow stories on firefighters, then you probably don’t know about the two firefighters who lost their lives and the other two who are critically injured on Christmas Eve, doing the job they loved most. Do you know that story? Do you know theirs? No? Well, let me share…

On Christmas Eve morning a report of a house fire in Webster, NY. When these men stepped out to do the job they love, the job they volunteer for, they found themselves under fire. Two were shot and killed right there, they went to the ground and never got up. Another two were alive, but not good. One of those men got on the radio and communicated clearly with dispatch, gave them information that saved many more lives. It was because of this firefighter that more units did not respond, he kept calm and gave clear radio traffic of the scene and what had happened.

The two firefighters that lost their lives? One was a 19 year old dispatched, Tomasz Kaczowka. The other firefighter was a Police Lieutenant, Michael Chiapperini. Remember those names, not the killer who’s name you will not find here. Those men died volunteering to put a fire out on Christmas Eve, they weren’t required to respond, they did because they wanted to.

The killer? His has a history, murdered in the past, was released from prison a while back, got a gun and was determined. How did he get a gun? Well you see…gun control doesn’t stop criminals! And according to the updates online, he left a note saying he wanted to take out as many people as he could. He took the coward way out, shot himself before police could get ahold of him. The report reads, “as a convicted felon, he could not legally own firearms.” Yet he had one…so for those of you that think gun control is the answer, think again!

There have been many firefighter shootings, most of which have similar details. They respond to a fire, step off the truck, then gunshots open up. The one I remember most, because I know many people from that area, happened on July 21, 2008. I don’t have to look that day up, I don’t have to research that, because I will never forget that day. It was just before I started my EMS career and it hit me hard, because this firefighter was friends with many of the firefighters I know from that area. It was an area I was considering moving to and starting work, but July 21, 2008 changed my life, as it changed many lives. A report of a house fire, a “routine” call, changed this department forever. They lost a brother, a friend, a young man just beginning his career, Ryan Hummert. He will never be forgotten there. When I go visit and see firetrucks and ambulances driving around, they still bear the sticker for him. They have a memorial and a scholarship fun in his name.

But Ryan wasn’t the first firefighter to be shot, nor will he be the last, however his had the most impact on me. There have been many shooting, some killed, other’s just injured on fire and EMS workers. Why? Did you know that many countries have agreed that hospitals and combat medics are off limits? That there is an agreement that you can’t injure those helping the injured? So why does it happen here, where there is no visible “war” going on? Because some people don’t care, some people want to kill and it doesn’t matter if you take away their guns and ammo…they will always find a way.

How many firefighters have been killed because they went into a house that was trapped? I can’t tell you that number because it’s unknown, but I can tell you there have been many. In fact, my department has training on what to watch for and how to help yourself in those situation because of a house that was trapped. No one lost their lives that day, but it was close. It was an arson fire, and this house had traps all over. Random holes cut in the floor, windows that won’t open, doors that are blocked, exits no longer exits, and this happens all too often. We watched a video in training, where the department responded to a house fire. One of the firefighters had a helmet camera (very educational) and when the firefighters opened the front door to enter, there was just enough light that night from the full moon to see that there was a massive 20×20 foot hole cut out in the floor. Had those firefighters entered, they would have fallen to the basement, and possibly never came out.

I picked a career that I love to do, I just pray the career doesn’t take me. Especially not when I have kids, I hope they never get the Chief’s vehicle and Chaplain knocking at the door. I pray that will never happen to them.